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The Magic of a Cardboard Box
Corrugated, Innovation, Sustainability

The Magic of a Cardboard Box

On April 20, Nintendo released a new line of accessories for its best-selling Switch game console. Rather than being digital add-ons, they were physical ones: punch-and-fold parts engineered to turn the Switch console into a piano, a fishing rod or a robot. All are made of cardboard. On March 4, Walmart ads shown during the Oscars centered on shipping boxes. The writer and director Dee Rees, nominated for “Mudbound,” created a 60-second ad in which the threat of bedtime gets incorporated into a sci-fi wonderland a little girl has imagined inside a blue cardboard box. In June 2014, Google handed out kits for a low-cost virtual reality headset to be used with a smartphone. The headset was named Cardboard, for what it was mostly made of, and users assembled the units themselves. In April 2012, “Caine’s Arcade,” an 11-minute short featuring a boy named Caine Monroy, was widely shared on the internet. Caine had spent his 2011 summer vacation building an arcade in the front of his father’s East Los Angeles auto-parts store out of the boxes the parts came in. He had the freedom to create an environment because cardboard comes cheap, and his father gave him space. These 21st-century storytellers turned to cardboard for the same reasons that children have long preferred the box to the toy that came in it: cardboard is light and strong, easy to put up, quick to come down and, perhaps most important, inexpensive enough for experiment. Cardboard constructions can be crushed, painted, recycled and stuck back together. Cardboard furniture can be adjusted as children grow, and cardboard creations become more sophisticated as children gain skills: It is as malleable as the body and the mind. Technology companies’ embrace of cardboard’s cool suggests something parents and teachers never forgot: The box is an avatar of inspiration, no charging required. Cardboard is the ideal material for creativity, and has been since the big purchase, and the big box, became a fixture of American postwar homes. Corrugated cardboard boxes were introduced in the 1880s, and slowly replaced wooden crates as the shipping method of choice. Robert Gair, a paper bag manufacturer in Brooklyn, realized that he could slice and crease paper on his machines in a single step. A box could quickly be cut out and scored, creating a flat blank ready to be assembled as needed, the same construction method exploited by Google and Nintendo. Because flattened boxes were easier to ship and distribute, manufacturers could buy them in bulk, assemble, and then ship their own product to consumers. As household objects grew larger, the play potential of those boxes increased. The purchase of a new washing machine was a cause for celebration in my neighborhood as a child, as it meant access to a new playhouse in somebody’s yard. Dr. Benjamin Spock praised the cardboard box as an inexpensive alternative to a ride-on car or a readymade cottage. In 1951, Charles and Ray Eames mocked up a version of the packing boxes for their Herman Miller storage furniture with pre-printed lines for doors, windows and awnings: When the adults bought a bookshelf, their kids would get a free toy. Cardboard was considered such a wonder material during this era that Manhattan’s Museum of Contemporary Craft (now the Museum of Arts and Design) devoted a 1967-1968 exhibition, “Made with Paper,” to the medium. With funding from the Container Corporation of America, the curator Paul J. Smith turned the museum galleries into a three-dimensional paper wonderland. The CCA also funded a cardboard playground created by students at the Parsons School of Design that included pleated trees, an enveloping sombrero and a movable maze for children to explore. James Hennessey and Victor Papanek’s “Nomadic Furniture,” published in 1973, was part of a renaissance in DIY instruction, one that emphasized the cardboard’s open-source bona fides, as online instructions for making your own Google Cardboard did. The “Nomadic” authors demonstrated how to create an entire cardboard lifestyle, one that could be tailored to different sizes, ages and abilities. Cardboard sets you free from the average, as Alex Truesdell discovered when she began to design furniture with children with disabilities. Truesdell, inspired by another 1970s cardboard carpentry book, developed play trays, booster seats, high chairs and other assistive devices made of corrugated cardboard that could help children with disabilities participate fully in society. As founder of the Adaptive Design Association, Ms. Truesdell was named a 2015 MacArthur Fellow for her work. Her organization offers classes and consultation in design and methods at no and low cost, and expects participants to pass on their knowledge. Cardboard, as a material, wants to be free. Source : www.cccabox.org
Innovating Corrugated Literally Demands Thinking Outside the Box
Corrugated, Innovation

Innovating Corrugated Literally Demands Thinking Outside the Box

Few things are as ubiquitous today as the humble cardboard box. Reliable, durable and easily transported, corrugated boxes have been around for over a century. However with longevity comes challenge—real innovation in such a commodity space, if possible, demands novel thinking. An astonishing 95% of all products in the US are shipped in corrugated Corrugated boxes are widely used for protective packaging of almost anything. In addition to protecting merchandise during transportation, corrugated packaging can be printed with various designs to enable effective product marketing for display in retail environments. The environmentally friendly image of corrugated boxes as a renewable resource and high rates of recycling and reusability have contributed to their widespread use in shipping and transportation of goods. The industry is doing well In the U.S. the manufacture and production of corrugated materials is a $28 billion industry. Over the last two decades the industry has seen a significant amount of consolidation as companies act strategically to protect proprietary trade secrets and obtain new technologies through the acquisition of smaller rivals. Industry consolidation is so rampant that twenty years ago, the top four players accounted for only 37% of the domestic corrugated supply market. By  2013, the top four producers were responsible for 75% of the same market. This “big fish eat little fish” type of behavior is indicative of the state of technology innovations within the corrugated space. In a commodity-based industry, driven by slim profit margins, highly susceptible to macroeconomic swings in GDP or manufacturing activity, corrugated suppliers continually seek high levels of vertical integration, in an effort to get a leg up on the competition. Major corrugated producers like International Paper are deeply integrated. They own the existing supply chain including the land and timber required for raw materials, the paper mills making kraft paper and the converting plants required for producing the final corrugated carton. What does this mean for end-users of corrugated? While integration benefits the corrugated suppliers by providing greater control over the value chain and increasing competitive advantage over smaller, less integrated suppliers, it has a deleterious effect on the pace and quality of new innovations, especially those relevant to the end consumer. Competition is a key driver of innovation as companies routinely seek to differentiate themselves from their competitors. When competition is eliminated and a monopoly is created, innovation is stifled and technological advancement stagnates. In the case of corrugated manufacturing, a recent search of the patent landscape shows the vast majority of new patent applications are primarily focused on new methods and processes to increase manufacturing efficiencies and lower production costs, rather than designing new and improved functionality for corrugated materials. The lack of focus on the needs and technical requirements of the end-users of corrugated, and the stranglehold that producers have over the entire corrugated supply chain, serves as a clear indicator of the need for disruption within the corrugated packaging industry. But wait, isn’t corrugated already the perfect packaging material? Corrugated is strong, inexpensive renewably sourced and can be readily recycled. These are a few of the properties underpinning the dominance of corrugated seen in today’s packaging applications, but it is not a perfect material. For example, corrugated boxes are routinely stacked in warehouses, distribution centers and trucks. In all cases stack height and stability have cost and safety implications. The height and stability of a stack rely on the Edge Compression Strength or Edge Crush Test (ECT) of the corrugated board. Changing relative humidity of the environment has a negative impact on the stiffness and integrity of the material and resultant strength of the box. In fact, under cyclic humidity conditions the lifetime of a corrugated cardboard box is one fifth that of a box exposed to constant humidity levels. In real world transit applications, goods may be transferred between environments multiple times before arriving at a final destination. The inevitable exposure to changing humidity levels results in a loss of strength, collapsing stacks and damaged/lost goods, the costs of which are transferred to the end users of corrugated. To mitigate these losses, an alternative material, lightweight and impervious to the environmental fluctuations is required. The truth behind corrugated recycling—it’s really good, but not great. The environmentally-friendly image of corrugated paperboard has contributed significantly to its widespread use in the transport of goods globally. Great strides have been made in developing methods and processes to improve the recoverability of old corrugated containers (OCC) for use in new cardboard boxes. In 2012, 91% of the corrugated packaging used in the United States was successfully recovered and used in the manufacture of new paper products, though only 50% of it went into the production of new corrugated containerboard. This is because the recycling of OCC to pulp is hard on the cellulose fibers from which corrugated is made—they break and shorten and containerboard made from them is less strong. Materials made from 100% recycled sources yield low grade product used in less demanding applications such as interior packaging, newsprint and other paper products. To counter this the manufacturing process typically uses at least 40% virgin fibers (direct from trees) in order to provide the requisite material strength. Additionally, the recycling process is extremely labor and energy intensive, and the final product may not fully meet the technical requirements of the end users. How then do we innovate? Given the state of corrugated manufacturing and the control that suppliers have over the industry, the fastest way to implement new innovations would seem to be to work directly with producers to target new and improved product functionality. Working within the existing supply chain should enable new product innovations to be developed rapidly, leveraging the scale and manufacturing expertise of large producers to bring improved corrugated packaging materials to market and make large scale impact. Close interaction between manufacturers and corrugated end-users would be necessary to ensure that any new innovations are relevant to the challenges that consumers currently face with existing paper-based packaging. However, the economics of the situation are not in favor of the end consumer and supply-chain inertia is great. Engineering new product innovation can be done, but putting it into an existing capital-intensive supply chain is not cheap, hence a major challenge is the capital investment required by corrugated producers to implement novel innovations. Further compounding the issue is that due to the limited options consumers have when it comes to sourcing inexpensive secondary packaging suppliers have no immediate motivation to invest in anything but their own cost-reduction initiatives. In spite of this dynamic, we are seeing small entrepreneurial efforts like GreenBox and the Rapid Packaging Container. In cases such as these innovative designs seek to enhance the functionality of existing boxes made from corrugated materials, thus increasing the value proposition to end-users. Thinking even more outside the box Thinking functionally, boxes do four things for us: they contain things (think verb containment rather than the noun container), they protect contents from various threats, they enable ease-of-handling things and they communicate information. Real out-of-the-box thinking starts with these fundamental functions, recognizing that we probably need to still provide for those functions, but maybe we don’t need to do it with a rectangular prismoidal box that engages the entire supply chain we currently know. A radical innovation would be to reinvent the supply chain, or parts of it. For example, eliminate corrugated materials altogether and contain/protect/enable/communicate via different mechanisms, or the same mechanisms with new materials. The development of novel materials which circumvent the common disadvantages of corrugated materials, while retaining their lightweight and sustainable characteristics, would create a significant disruption in a stagnant industry. Already we are seeing a gradual shift towards the use of Reusable Plastic Containers (RPCs) to transport certain goods such as fruits and vegetables. These containers provide superior protection by means of greater stacking strength, and enhanced durability, remaining impervious to changing environmental conditions. The ability to easily reuse an RPC multiple times dramatically changes it’s value proposition, reducing its carbon footprint without requiring the construction of an entirely new box. New material startups like Aeroclay, UFP Technologies, Ecovative and Biome3D are all actively seeking to disrupt traditional packaging methods with the development of new, innovative materials, sustainably sourced with an emphasis on biodegradability. One particularly exciting example is the plant-based bioplastic designed for use in 3D printing applications. This flexible thin-film material is food safe and has excellent thermal resistance and is completely biodegradable making an interesting candidate in the hunt for alternative packaging materials. The rise of automated 3D printing in conjunction with molded fiber packaging and these new, sustainable materials points towards a promising future for the packaging industry. We can and should try to innovate the commodity Corrugated paperboard materials were invented in the late nineteenth century, and their use as transport packaging materials took off at the beginning of the twentieth century. Most innovations since, have been incremental. The corrugated medium is a mature technology sitting at the very top of its technology S-curve—the focus is on production cost rather than improved overall box value. In order to provide greater value by addressing the demands of 21st century consumers, and compete in today’s rapidly changing economy, disruption and the leap to a new technology S-curve is not only required, but essential.
Four technologies poised to disrupt the specialty paper market
Corrugated, Innovation, News

Four technologies poised to disrupt the specialty paper market

Nov. 7, 2017 - In its latest research, Smithers Pira has identified four novel technologies that are set to increase capacity and enable new product opportunities for manufacturers of specialty papers across the next five years.
The new Smithers Pira market report – The Future of Speciality Papers to 2022 – provides a comprehensive overview of this important sector of the paper industry. It incorporates both higher volume applications, like flexible packaging and label stocks, and more niche segments like electrical insulation, filtration and security papers.Smithers Pira analyzes the different fortunes to chart how global consumption of speciality papers in 2017 has reached 24.16 million tonnes. Steady growth will continue through the end of the decade at 2.2 per cent per year to push this figure to 26.98 million tonnes in 2022. Spec_Papers-Chart1.jpg Figure: Smithers Pira U.S. perspective   Unsurprisingly the U.S. dominates specialty paper demand in the Western hemisphere. In 2017 U.S. market share for the Americas is 64 per cent (by volume); or just over 16 per cent of global demand. Expansion in the U.S. will continue across the next five years, but at a slower rate to less mature markets in the region, principally Brazil. Across the next five years the U.S. will also be displaced by China as the world’s single largest national market for specialty papers. The plummet in printing and writing paper demand linked to the emergence of the Internet began in the U.S., and it continues to reshape the papermaking landscape. Speciality papers have become attractive for stranded assets that are new and can be economically refocused – filtration and battery insulator papers in particular are showing good resilience in the face of the broader industry competition with polymer alternatives. Simultaneously the paper industry continues its consolidation trend, which is carrying over into the speciality business. Disruptive technologies As a diverse, high-value sector, the specialty papers market provides a strong forum for the initial deployment of technical innovations, to open new market applications and realize production efficiencies. Smithers research has identified four key developments that will help underpin future growth in specialty papers both in the North America and further afield across 2017-2022: • Foam forming • Precision control on large format machines • Industry 4.0 • Stretchability Foam forming First developed in the 1970s, foam forming is a papermaking process that can produce nonwoven-type materials on paper machines with excellent formation uniformity, bulk and porosity. Critically successful commercialization will allow paper machines to produce nonwovens substitutes at lower costs than the current slow airlaid or wetlaid nonwoven production platforms. Foam forming is a multi-phase fluid system structured by the presence of gas bubbles separated by thin liquid films. The bubbles impart increased sheet bulk and porosity to the paper. As the process has undergone a series of recent technical refinements, new systems employing foam forming are now entering commercial production for specialty paper types. A key focus is maintaining sheet strength while not compromising the enhanced paper bulk; one process is employing cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) to give a reported 16 to 19 per cent improvement in tensile strength. The first product to come from the 21st-Century foam forming development is Paptic’s extensible paper bag stock which offers a more environmentally friendly substitute for plastic. Precision in papermaking State-of-the-art precision technology developed for the commodity grades will steadily find a wider use on speciality machines too. These platforms offer multiple benefits with reduced product variation, resulting in tighter specifications with less waste from changeovers, rejected lots, or over-designed products that use excess fibre to cover poor variability and reproducibility. In practice this means lighter paper grades from high-precision machines can compete with the same performance as heavier-weight papers from less precise machines. Simultaneously, superior coater designs are facilitating quick changes of coating formulations between grades with little time or material waste. Improved product quality and costs will allow increased penetration of speciality paper grades into new applications and markets. However, a more disruptive impact will be the implementation of precision technology on faster and wider papermaking machines allowing them to compete in the speciality spaces that have hitherto relied on slower, labour-intensive papermaking. Industry 4.0  Running in parallel to greater precision, paper making is also adapting its systems to enable greater automation and data exchange. Across all manufacturing sectors this has been dubbed Industry 4.0. While computers have been used on paper machines since the 1960s, new systems are integrating technical processes, quality systems and supply chain management in automated harmonized systems that reduce cost and will allow larger production lines to behave like small and nimble producers of the past. In combination with new on-line sensors for real-time monitoring of product attributes these will enable owners of larger and wider machines to deliver the precision required in many specialty grades. A fine example of this trend is the evolution of headboxes with online CD basis-weight profiling. The headbox slice is kept as straight as possible, but the excess weight in a small area is corrected by injecting water in narrow segments to displace just the excess fibre. This is finally a robust control system for headbox fibre weight distribution. It matches the precision of the new high-resolution sheet scanner systems, correcting fibre weight differences in the cross direction of the tissue sheet. Stretchable papers Initially developed in Europe by Gruppo di X, and beta tested with Innventia in Sweden, the capacity to develop stretchable papers is now a commercial reality via a licensing deal with BillerudKorsnäs in Europe. The mould paper produced using Gruppo di X’s trademarked Papermorphosis process relies on mechanical treatment to achieve a base sheet with 20 per cent stretchability in the machine direction and 16 per cent in the cross direction. Stretchable papers are a new concept intended to replace plastics with natural paper webs, aligning with brand desires for a more sustainable persona, especially for single-use packaging. They can be supplied in reels that can be printed, coated and otherwise processed on traditional converting lines previously used for polymers. The key end products include tray-format packaging and pharmaceutical blisters for stiffness and advertising, paper cups and other liquid containers, and decorative foils for furniture.
How to handle hand holes on corrugated boxes
Corrugated, Innovation

How to handle hand holes on corrugated boxes

When the size and/or weight of the product justifies them, hand holes (also known as access holes) are designed into corrugated boxes to facilitate safe manual handling. The categories of such products are diverse, examples being wide-screen televisions, printers, windows, patio doors, garage doors, automotive body replacement parts, in addition to various multi-pack consumer non-durables sold in big-box stores. ASTM D6804-02 Standard Guide for Hand Hole Design in Corrugated Boxes provides general guidelines, but concedes, “It is not intended to provide specific information on the design of hand holes.” A user of corrugated boxes with hand holes needs application-specific knowledge; otherwise, the boxes might prove to be unfit for their intended purposes. Hand holes are a simple concept, entrapping some users into believing that it’s no more complex than die-cutting some openings into a corrugated blank. Such thinking is a main reason why, every year, there are accounts of hand holes failing, causing injuries at work, retail, or home. The ensuing discussion identifies the major variables and considerations that should be brought to bear. Board. Corrugated paperboard is an engineered structure, having a strength-to-weight ratio that makes it unrivaled for box construction. That distinction aside, there are still decisions to be made as to the board and its properties. Should it be single-wall, double-wall, or triple-wall? What type(s) of flute? Virgin Kraft or recycled? Mullen Burst Test or Edge Crush Test? Keeping in mind that with the aforementioned types of large and/or heavy products that justify hand holes, double-wall should be the default choice. That’s because single-wall might not embody the required strength, and if triple-wall strength is required, the load is likely one best suited for mechanical handling. With double-wall, it’s best not to use the same flute for both layers, to avoid arches aligning one on top of the other. When different flutes are used, their heights and number-per-linear unit make for an alignment that’s staggered and more resistant to forces. Beyond that, A/B, A/C, B/C, etc. each yields a distinct board thickness. Furthermore, the properties of a given combination can differ, depending on which is the outer and which is the inner flute. Sustainability notwithstanding, there’s no denying that virgin Kraft is stronger than recycled. If the required measure-of-safety only can be met with virgin, then, so be it. That certainly applies to the liners, but can apply to the flutes, as well. Mullen Burst Test and Edge Crush Test (ECT) indicate resistance to rough handling and to compression (stacking), respectively. Hand holes have an influence on which test is designated on the box maker’s certificate (BMC). The reason is that hand holes remove material from the box, rendering it weaker. This is a fact that should be compensated for in the cited test score (pounds per square inch or pounds per inch, for Mullen and ECT, respectively).
Box style. The regular slotted container (RSC) is the most popular style due to its efficient use of corrugated board. When a RSC has hand holes, they are located on the end panels. Other box styles, particularly those that are tall and long, are known to have hand holes on end panels and side panels. Regardless of box style, hand holes present two major concerns: how the bottom is secured, and the location of the hand holes (which determines how much material is between the hand holes and the top score line of the panel). When a box is lifted via hand holes, the weight of the contents is supported by the bottom of the box. If not adequately secured, the bottom will give. This means that contents will fall through, resulting in content damage and possibly personal injury. Even when the bottom is adequately secured, if there is not enough board between the hand holes and the top of the panel, the board can rupture from the force of lifting, likely causing the handler to drop that end of the box. Size and shape of hand holes. As perviously mentioned, hand holes, because they remove board, weaken a box. It logically follows that the size and shape of the hand holes should be a trade-off between function and practicality. Ergonomics come into play. What size hand should the hole accommodate, given that both males and females might be handlers? A related consideration is whether the hole should accommodate a gloved hand or just a bare one. As for shape, an elongated oval is common, but does not exclude other shapes from consideration. The orientation of the hand, relative to the handling is critical. Lifting, for example, requires a palms-up insertion, whereas pulling can be performed with a variety of hand positions. The preceding comment can serve as segue into a discussion on printed warnings and safety instructions regarding hand holes. Some communications in the form of icons, for example, designate the handling as a two-person operation. Other communications, such as upward-pointing arrows, convey that the hand holds are for lifting as opposed to pulling. The rationale in that case is that the holds are more resistant to the forces imposed by lifting than they are to the forces imposed by pulling. Then again, if pulling is to be regarded as a misuse of the hand holes, it’s nonetheless a foreseeable misuse; therefore, the box should be able to withstand such handling, short of the abusive variety. Reinforcement. Hand holes can fail, but susceptibility to failure can be lessened by different ways of reinforcement, including plastic inserts and filament tape. Such methods, however, add costs, not just in material, but also in labor and in tooling. On a cost-effective basis, reinforcement of hand holes is rarely if ever justified when the other variables and considerations mentioned in this article are skillfully managed, resulting in boxes well-suited for their intended purposes. But how is such fitness determined? ASTM D6804-02 lists various evaluation methodologies in that pursuit. However, any stakeholder is free to design something proprietary, or even choose shipping tests, in lieu of or in combination with laboratory testing. In the final analysis, the design of hand holes for corrugated boxes is not an undertaking that manages itself. To the contrary, it’s a hands-on project.   Source : www.packworld.com
Generation Z fuels the digital marketing explosion
Innovation, Trends

Generation Z fuels the digital marketing explosion

Good-bye baby boomers--even millennials are somewhat easier to target than the true digital natives, Generation Z. Marketers struggle to build brand loyalty, but digital printing helps deliver the message. “Generation Z, born between 1995 and 2012 are not brats,” says Doris Brown-McNally, HP Global Brand Innovations Manager. “They were simply raised with a different aesthetic. They are, in fact, the most sophisticated generation ever.” These remarks came in Chicago, June 4-5 at Smithers Pira’s “Digital Print for Packaging US 2018.” “Even millennials (born between 1980 and 1994) grew into using technology,” says Brown-McNally. “Generation Z is the first generation of true digital natives." “They are engaged by what I would call philanthropic marketing,” says Brown-McNally. “Marketing connected to causes and events. For these consumers, the purchase of a brand is a reflection of their values and interests.” Gen Z may take it to the extreme, but philanthropic marketing is not new. Back in 2010, the Cone LLC Cause Evolution Studyfound an astonishing 85 percent of consumers have a more positive image of a product or company when it supports a cause they care about. The report also says 80 percent of Americans "are likely to switch brands, about equal in price and quality, to one that supports a cause." Consumers even weighed in on causes that win their brand loyalty including: economic development, health and disease, hunger, education, clean water, disaster relief, environment, homeless & housing, crime and violence prevention, equal rights/diversity. Amarula cream liqueur from Cape Town, South Africa, launched a “Name Them/Save Them campaign for African Elephants. Label producer SA Litho, produced randomly-generated digitally printed labels for a limited edition of 400,000 bottles, representing the 400,000 African elephants that experts now estimate remain in the wild. Consumers got to design their own elephant on-line and each elephant label had a unique name. “Both millennials and Z’ers also want brands to recognize them as individuals,” says Brown-McNally. Diet Coke offered the same iconic bottle shape, along with a dizzying number of design variations, that delivered personalization through visualization. Choose your favorite. The one that suits you. Finally, these new consumers demand entertainment. Inspired by the adult coloring book trend, Mondelēz International let shoppers design their own Oreo cookie pack delivered to their door in days. Prices paid on-line for these personalized “gift” items are far greater than store shelf equivalents. And generate a terrific amount of social media reinforcing brand loyalty. Digitally printed “collector series” labels, cans or other packaging can introduce consumers to new flavors. La Catrina wine offered a range of varieties but only one, chardonnay, was selling briskly. They hired a local artist to design a family of “Day of the Dead” characters on full-bottle shrink labels. Brilliant, colorful label designs encouraged fans of the chardonnay to sample other offerings and to collect every label design in the family. Empty bottles filled with twinkle lights have been spotted on social media.
Digital printing can be integrated with customer order data, including personalized photos, home teams, family events, favorite bands at concerts, etc. to drive “microburst” marketing events yielding millions of social media touches. Some of the sports and entertainment campaigns can get complicated and expensive with licensing fees, however. Want more engagement? Point your smart phone at a bottle of 19 Crimes wine, and the label comes alive and tells you a story. Some old folks are shopping and customizing on-line as well. As Karen English, Printpack’s Marketing Director, told the Digital Print for Packaging audience later in the day, “How else could you buy a party-size, brand-name bag of chips adorned with a Green Bay Packers logo? Not in the grocery store in Wisconsin, but rather delivered to your brother-in-law’s doorstep in Dallas, TX, just in time for the big Green Bay vs. Dallas game!” Source : www.packworld.com
Packaging Materials Market to Hit $1.3 Trillion by 2024
News, Retail, Trends

Packaging Materials Market to Hit $1.3 Trillion by 2024

According to a new research report by Global Market Insights Inc. the packaging materials market size is expanding at over 3 percent CAGR and will cross USD $1.3 trillion by 2024. Developments in the Asia Pacific food & beverage sector will be a major reason behind the market growth. The Asia Pacific region includes a large number of emerging economies such as China, India, South Korea, etc. These countries have been witnessing increased consumption of food & beverage products which will, in turn, drive packaging materials market demand. In 2016, the Asia Pacific food & beverage industry registered a turnover of exceeding USD $3 trillion and is likely to witness a high growth rate. The three most important food segments that are driving the Asia Pacific food market are grain mill products, meat products, and oils and fats. These developments will boost demand for flexible & rigid plastics, glass, metal, and paper packaging materials demand throughout the forecast span. Consumption of beverages in Asia Pacific has also been on the rise in the last two decades. The region is the largest beverage market in the world accounting for more than 40 percent of the worldwide consumption. Among all beverage products, alcoholic drinks were an important segment in the region with beer being the major product. Beer consumption in Asia Pacific is the highest in the world, while China is the largest market among all countries in the world. Annual consumption has been on the rise in some Asia Pacific countries such as Vietnam, India and South Korea. The consumption of non-alcoholic beverages such as sugar sweetened drinks, health drinks and fruit juices are also on the rise in Asia Pacific, owing to increasing income levels and changing consumption trends. These factors will drive demand for beverage packaging materials such as rigid plastic, metal and glass, and will augment the packaging materials market growth through the forecast period. Flexible plastics is the largest materials segment in the packaging materials market in terms of volume. This segment is likely to be valued over USD $190 billion by 2024. The segments growth will be augmented by extensive usage in packaging food items and household products. The availability of a broad range of flexible plastic materials with distinct characteristics has turned this segment into one of the most important materials in the industry. The ability of flexible plastics to be manufactured in a range of shapes and sizes, lower weight, inert nature, superior performance characteristics, low cost, and easy printability makes it the most versatile packing material. Bags, pouches and wraps is the largest product segment in the packaging materials market as they are used for packaging a wide variety of items including food, detergents, beverages, etc. This segment will cover over one-third of the overall packing industry in terms of value. Characteristics such as lower comparative costs, ease of storage and handling, along with the availability of many specialty products like retort packaging, shrink films, etc. will augment bags, pouches and wraps packing materials market growth in the forecast period. Among the end-users in the packaging materials market, the beverage segment is likely to grow by a CAGR above 4 percent to reach a market value exceeding USD $300 billion by 2024. Rising popularity of health drinks, plant-based waters, sugar-sweetened beverages and alcoholic drinks will be the key factor behind this segment’s development. Increasing consumption of packaged drinking water across the globe will also contribute to the industry’s development through the forecast period. Source : www.packagingstrategies.com
Why Corrugated Packaging is the Future
Corrugated, Sustainability, Trends

Why Corrugated Packaging is the Future

Corrugated packaging is said to have to been born in 1817, exactly two centuries ago, in England. Since then, known by various names, the humble cardboard box has come a long way from being first used as reliable packaging for cereal boxes. I own a candy business, and only recently realized the practicality and ease of using corrugated board for POP displays.

Corrugated packaging is as popular as ever, and to say that it is coming back would be saying only the partial truth. In fact, according to a report by Smithers Pira, the demand for corrugated packaging is set to reach a whopping $176 billion by 2019. For businesses like mine, the material provides versatility, and has a warm, welcoming feel that plastic and steel displays could sometimes lack. Read on to know why I think it is next big thing in POP marketing and packaging, read on.

Industry Trends and Forecasts

Be it product packaging or point-of-purchase displays, cardboard is fast turning out to be the go-to material. According to a Technavio report cited on Packaging Strategies, the global market for corrugated box packaging is being touted to achieve a growth rate of 4.8% till 2020.

The reasons for this unprecedented growth in the usage of the humble paperboard are many. Markets all over the world are going green, and sustainability is suddenly a huge trend. As opposed to plastic packaging, cardboard is recyclable and biodegradable. Moreover, according to a report by Mintel, once the price and perceived quality of a certain product are the same, consumers are more likely to go for products with environmental benefits.

Another reason behind the steep rise in the corrugated packaging is the expansion of the e-commerce industry. An article on Business Insider quotes a National Retail Federation report predicting a healthy growth for e-commerce growth in the US. The demand for corrugated packaging for shipments has grown in correspondence to this.

Upsides of Corrugated Packaging

I opted for POP displays made from corrugated material keeping in mind also the scope it offers in terms of customizability, cost-effectiveness and compactness. I began manufacturing caramel candies with a chocolate centre, in early 2014 in Brooklyn, and thought about expanding to stores in New York and bordering states last year. This was when I came across the point of purchase display that Metaline had designed for Hi-Chew.

This design that I’m talking about, was designed something on the lines of cardboard vending machine, with a half-open compartment, full of candies, at the bottom. It was just this sort of room for cost-effective craftsmanship that attracted me to corrugate POP displays. Corrugate displays also keep moisture away, provide a fair bit of cushioning for the contents, and can be used to store and display a diverse range of products.

POP displays made of paperboard are also great surfaces when it comes to printing graphics. Colors and text stand out like on few other substrates. I recently began getting bigger paperboard displays to use over longer periods of time, designing them so as to refill them with different categories of products.

https://medium.com/@jeremylawson08/why-corrugated-packaging-is-the-future-4c683a946184 Source : www.medium.com
Packaging Materials Affect Perceived Value of E-Commerce Shipments
Corrugated, Designers, Trends

Packaging Materials Affect Perceived Value of E-Commerce Shipments

A new study conducted by the University of Wisconsin (UW) in Madison shows that the value perception of e-commerce shipments is significantly impacted by the materials chosen to protect them. Even a small increase in packaging material expenditures—as little as 19 cents—can make a dramatic impact (as much as 45 percent) on the perceived value. “There is strong evidence that the unboxing experience impacts customers’ emotions and their perceptions of product value. When a retailer gets the unboxing experience right, they demonstrate that the product is valuable and worth protecting. Consumers recognize that signal, and it influences their perception of quality. As e-commerce continues to be the growth engine for retail, retailers and brands must understand their new showplace is the parcel packaging," said Page Moreau, UW professor of marketing. The study included 60 participants, split into two groups of 30. Each group was asked to unbox the same product—a bamboo bowl, with an actual retail price of $25. The participants were unaware of the actual cost of the bowl, so that perception could be captured. The two groups were presented with a box prepared with very different packaging. One package is best described as ”economy”—plain brown box with white polystyrene foam for inside protection and clear carton sealing tape. The other package would be considered “premium.” The product was housed in a white box, clear inflated hybrid cushioning featuring a square pattern to protect the contents and soft white foam wrapped around the bowl with a “thank you” sticker.  White carton sealing tape was used on the exterior. Participants only saw one version of the packaging so they were not aware that there was a different option. After the unboxing experience, participants were asked to complete a survey which focused on the following areas—expected price, likelihood to gift, unboxing emotions, packaging perception, and the most likely retail outlet that the package came from. Across all attributes, the premium packaging components scored higher—including expected retail value of the product which was a significant 45% higher than the economy packaging for the identical product. The study clearly demonstrates that while the primary product package continues to be extremely important, the parcel packaging selected to translate the brand promise should be given equal consideration now that the buying experience is moving into the consumer’s home. Source : www.packagingstrategies.com
What you need to know about the global snack food market
Innovation, Trends

What you need to know about the global snack food market

Smaller geographic markets will lead future growth in this $280 billion market. According to new research by PMMI Business Intelligence, Europe holds the largest share of the global snack food market at 45%, followed by North America at 33%. Though these largest markets have shown flat to slow growth in recent years, developing countries such as those in Latin America and Asia Pacific will continue to grow at the fastest rate. Savory snacks are growing at a greater rate than sweet snacks. In 2015 the global savory snack market was valued at $94.3 billion. By 2025 it is expected to grow to $220 billion. (8.8% CAGR) The largest savory snack segments making up for more than ¾ of the market are:
  • Salted Snacks (potato/corn chips)
  • Processed snacks
  • Nuts & Seeds
Globally, Nuts & Seeds is one of the fastest growing savory snack sub-segments, with rising demand from countries such as Japan and Brazil and a CAGR of 9.4% from 2016 to 2025. North America represented the largest geographic market for savory snacks worldwide in 2016 with a $73.6 billion share of the market. However, North American growth is projected to be around 4%, much slower than the 8.8% global average. Faster than the overall savory snack market growth rate, the Meat snacks sub-market grew 15% in North America. In Latin American countries the savory Crackers & Rice Cakes sub-market grew 21%. Healthy snacks (including Bars) and Combination snacks are driving the current growth of the North American market and are forecasted to continue on a fast growth trajectory.
  • Healthy: organic, clean label (simple recipes), macronutrients
  • Combination: different type of foods in one package, used as meal replacement
One result of the snack food market growth for the packaging industry is the potential growing demand for flow wrappers (Bars), pouch-filling machinery (esp. FFS) and SRP-based case packers (Nuts & Seeds), as well as rigid tray filling equipment (Meat/Cheese/Fresh combination snacks).   Source : www.packworld.com